Category Archives: Laptop

Virtual Desktop Infrastructure vs Remote Desktop Service

Desktop virtualization has become an inevitable option for businesses to optimize resources, provide mobility solutions, and deliver a higher level of performance.

Virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) is virtualization technology that hosts a desktop operating system on a centralized server in a data center. VDI is a variation on the client-server computing model, sometimes referred to as server-based computing.

Remote Desktop Services (RDS) is an umbrella term for features of Microsoft Windows Server that allow users to remotely access graphical desktops and Windows applications. 

For desktop virtualization, companies can choose between VDI or RDS: either a virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) or a remote desktop service (RDS).

While both these technologies have their own strengths and weaknesses, they each have a specific purpose, and businesses need to choose the right solution for their desktop virtualization requirements based on their present and future business needs. 

Benefits of VDI:

  • Utilization of Same Image.
  • Management of a Single OS Can Reduce Costs.
  • Processing moves from individual workstations to a VDI server.
  • Troubleshooting Problems is Easier.
  • Data is More Secure.

Benefits of RDS:

  • Single point of maintenance.
  • Install once, use many.
  • Reduced licenses expense.
  • Solid Security.
  • Lower Costs.

VDI is different from RDS in various ways:

  1. In a RDS environment multiple users can access a single environment, which could be customized on a per user basis but resources are not dedicated to a particular user. Whereas, In a VDI environment each user either accesses their own centrally hosted physical PC or VM or they can access a shared VM.
  2. Also, In a VDI environment physical CPU, Memory and Disk capacity can be allocated to particular user which stops one user’s actions affecting other users.
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Where is environment variables?

Every process has an environment block that contains a set of environment variables and their values. There are two types of environment variables: user environment variables (set for each user) and system environment variables (set for everyone). An environment variable is a dynamic-named value that can affect the way running processes will behave on a computer.

By default, a child process inherits the environment variables of its parent process. Programs started by the command processor inherit the command processor’s environment variables.

How to set or change the Environment Variables?

Windows

Environment Variables

Windows 10 and Windows 8
  1. In Search, search for and then select: System (Control Panel)
  2. Click the Advanced system settings link.
  3. Click Environment Variables. In the section System Variables, find the PATH environment variable and select it. Click Edit. If the PATH environment variable does not exist, click New.
  4. In the Edit System Variable (or New System Variable) window, specify the value of the PATHenvironment variable. Click OK. Close all remaining windows by clicking OK.
  5. Reopen Command prompt window, and run your java code.
Windows 7
  1. From the desktop, right click the Computer icon.
  2. Choose Properties from the context menu.
  3. Click the Advanced system settings link.
  4. Click Environment Variables. In the section System Variables, find the PATH environment variable and select it. Click Edit. If the PATH environment variable does not exist, click New.
  5. In the Edit System Variable (or New System Variable) window, specify the value of the PATHenvironment variable. Click OK. Close all remaining windows by clicking OK.
  6. Reopen Command prompt window, and run your java code.
Windows Vista
  1. From the desktop, right click the My Computer icon.
  2. Choose Properties from the context menu.
  3. Click the Advanced tab (Advanced system settings link in Vista).
  4. Click Environment Variables. In the section System Variables, find the PATH environment variable and select it. Click Edit. If the PATH environment variable does not exist, click New.
  5. In the Edit System Variable (or New System Variable) window, specify the value of the PATHenvironment variable. Click OK. Close all remaining windows by clicking OK.
  6. Reopen Command prompt window, and run your java code.
Windows XP
  1. Select Start, select Control Panel. double click System, and select the Advanced tab.
  2. Click Environment Variables. In the section System Variables, find the PATH environment variable and select it. Click Edit. If the PATH environment variable does not exist, click New.
  3. In the Edit System Variable (or New System Variable) window, specify the value of the PATHenvironment variable. Click OK. Close all remaining windows by clicking OK.
  4. Reopen Command prompt window, and run your java code.

Mac OS X

To run a different version of Java, either specify the full path, or use the java_home tool:

% /usr/libexec/java_home -v 1.8.0_73 --exec javac -version

Solaris and Linux

  1. To find out if the path is properly set:
    In a terminal windows, enter:
    % java -version
    This will print the version of the java tool, if it can find it. If the version is old or you get the error java: Command not found, then the path is not properly set.
  2. Determine which java executable is the first one found in your PATH
    In a terminal window, enter:
    % which java
Set the PATH permanently

To set the path permanently, set the path in your startup file.
Note: Instructions for two most popular Shells on Linux and Solaris are listed.

Bash Shell

Edit the startup file (~/.bashrc)

  1. Modify PATH variable
    PATH=/usr/local/jdk1.8.0/bin:$PATH
    export PATH
  2. Save and close the file
  3. Load the startup file
    % . /.profile
  4. Verify that the path is set by repeating the java command
    % java -version
C Shell (csh)

Edit the startup file (~/.cshrc)

  1. Set Path
    set path=(/usr/local/jdk1.8.0/bin $path)
  2. Save and close the file
  3. Load the startup file
    % source ~/.cshrc
  4. Verify that the path is set by repeating the java command
    % java -version

 

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